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Monthly Archives: March, 2020

  1. Virtual Care Through AdvancedTelemedicine

    Keeping our patients, visitors and team members safe is our top priority. We are grateful for your patience and understanding while we work diligently to address this rapidly evolving situation. We are committed to delivering the highest quality care as we move through this challenging time.

     

    Keep Appointments

    Virtual Care

    For many of our patients, it is important to keep your appointments especially if you have a chronic condition. Your doctor will contact you if your appointments can be done virtually through a telehealth visit, otherwise, plan to come to the office.  Other specific services such as Spravato treatments will continue to be provided in the office with all safety precautions in place.  Make sure to call ahead if you are feeling ill. Our offices are taking special precautions to protect the health and safety of patients during this time. If you need medication refills or have a question for our office, please use our Patient Portal to communicate with us directly or call the main office number (844-534-7208).

    Carolina Behavioral Care will be offering virtual care through our Electronic Health Record, AdvancedMD’s AdvancedTelemedicine, on a practice wide basis beginning March 25, 2020 except for patients that require continuing office based care. This is an online way to virtually connect with your provider from any mobile device or computer with a camera. You’ll be scheduled with your provider for your care, and they can send a prescription to our CBC pharmacy who in turn will mail it to you. End-to-end care, without leaving home.

  2. IMPORTANT: Patient Care During COVID-19

    03/17/2020

    This announcement is for all patients during the Coronavirus state of emergency. Your care is very important to us and, to that effect, Carolina Behavioral Care will be open at the Durham, Hillsborough and Pinehurst sites (as long as safely possible). Please note, that we will contact you if we need to reschedule your appointment. We are open during regular hours for all clinical and pharmacy services. We will provide updates weekly, or if circumstances change, to your phone, our website and our Facebook page.

    If you have a fever or have been in contact with someone who is known to have Coronavirus, we ask that you call us. We will offer options for care including refilling your prescription. If you are experiencing shortness of breath, please contact your primary care provider, urgent care center or emergency room immediately.

    We are in the process of offering telehealth services so that you can receive treatment from your home by using your cell phone (iPhone or Android), computer or tablet. Instructions for receiving these services will be on carolinabehavioralcare.com (once available).

  3. Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

    The following is an article from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For more information regarding COVID-19, please visit their website.

    The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may be stressful for people and communities. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children.

    Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations.  The emotional impact of an emergency on a person can depend on the person’s characteristics and experiences, the social and economic circumstances of the person and their community, and the availability of local resources. People can become more distressed if they see repeated images or hear repeated reports about the outbreak in the media.

    People who may respond more strongly to the stress of a crisis include:

    • People who have preexisting mental health conditions including problems with substance use
    • Children
    • People who are helping with the response to COVID-19, like doctors and other health care providers, or first responders

    Additional information and resources on mental health care can be found at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) website.

    • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Hotline: 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
    • People with deafness or hearing loss can use their preferred relay service to call 1-800-985-5990.

    Reactions during an infectious disease outbreak can include:

    • Fear and worry about your own health status and that of your loved ones who may have been exposed to COVID-19
    • Changes in sleep or eating patterns
    • Difficulty sleeping or concentrating
    • Worsening of chronic health problems
    • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

    People with preexisting mental health conditions should continue with their treatment plans during an emergency and monitor for any new symptoms. Additional information can be found at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) website.

    Coping with these feelings and getting help when you need it will help you, your family, and your community recover from a disaster. Connect with family, friends, and others in your community. Take care of yourself and each other, and know when and how to seek help.

    Call your healthcare provider if stress reactions interfere with your daily activities for several days in a row.

    Things you can do to support yourself:

    • Avoid excessive exposure to media coverage of COVID-19.
    • Take care of your body. Take deep breaths, stretch or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, exercise regularly, get plenty of sleep and avoid alcohol and drugs.
    • Make time to unwind and remind yourself that strong feelings will fade. Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories. It can be upsetting to hear about the crisis and see images repeatedly. Try to do some other activities you enjoy to return to your normal life.
    • Connect with others. Share your concerns and how you are feeling with a friend or family member. Maintain healthy relationships.
    • Maintain a sense of hope and positive thinking.

    Share the facts about COVID-19 and the actual risk to others. People who have returned from areas of ongoing spread more than 14 days ago and do not have symptoms of COVID-19 do not put others at risk.

    What are quarantine and social distancing?

    • Quarantine separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick.
    • Social distancing means remaining out of places where people meet or gather, avoiding local public transportation (e.g., bus, subway, taxi, rideshare), and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others.

    Sharing accurate information can help calm fears in others and allow you to connect with them.

    Learn more about taking care of your emotional health.

    For parents:

    Children react, in part, on what they see from the adults around them. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to others around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

    Not all children respond to stress in the same way. Some common changes to watch for in children:

    • Excessive crying and irritation
    • Returning to behaviors they have outgrown (e.g., toileting accidents or bedwetting)
    • Excessive worry or sadness
    • Unhealthy eating or sleeping habits
    • Irritability and “acting out” behaviors
    • Poor school performance or avoiding school
    • Difficulty with attention and concentration
    • Avoidance of activities enjoyed in the past
    • Unexplained headaches or body pain
    • Use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

    There are many things you can do to support your child:

    • Take time to talk with your child about the COVID-19 outbreak. Answer questions and share facts about COVID-19 in a way that your child can understand.
    • Reassure your child that they are safe. Let them know if is ok if they feel upset. Share with them how you deal with your own stress so that they can learn how to cope from you.
    • Limit your child’s exposure to media coverage of the event. Children may misinterpret what they hear and can be frightened about something they do not understand.
    • Help your child to have a sense of structure. Once it is safe to return to school or child care, help them return to their regular activity.
    • Be a role model; take breaks, get plenty of sleep, exercise, and eat well. Connect with your friends and family members and rely on your social support system.

    Learn more about helping children cope.

    For responders:

    Responding to COVID-19 can take an emotional toll on you. There are things you can do to reduce secondary traumatic stress (STS) reactions:

    • Acknowledge that STS can impact anyone helping families after a traumatic event.
    • Learn the symptoms including physical (fatigue, illness) and mental (fear, withdrawal, guilt).
    • Allow time for you and your family to recover from responding to the outbreak.
    • Create a menu of personal self-care activities that you enjoy, such as spending time with friends and family, exercising, or reading a book.
    • Take a break from media coverage of COVID-19.
    • Ask for help if you feel overwhelmed or concerned that COVID-19 is affecting your ability to care for your family and patients as you did before the outbreak.

    For people who have been released from quarantine:

    Being separated from others if a health care provider thinks you may have been exposed to COVID-19 can be stressful, even if you do not get sick. Some typical reactions after being released from COVID-19 quarantine can include:

    • Mixed emotions, including relief after quarantine
    • Fear and worry about your own health status and that of your loved ones who may have been exposed to COVID-19
    • Stress from the experience of monitoring yourself, or being monitored by others for signs and symptoms of COVID-19
    • Sadness, anger, or frustration because friends or loved ones have unfounded fears of contracting the disease from contact with you, even though you have been determined not to be contagious
    • Guilt about not being able to perform normal work or parenting duties during quarantine
    • Other emotional or mental health changes

    Children may also feel upset or have other strong emotions if they, or someone they know, has been released from quarantine. You can help your child cope.

    Learn more tips for taking care of yourself during emergency response.

  4. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

    How to Protect You and Your Family from COVID-19

    The providers and staff at Carolina Behavioral Care want our patients and the communities they serve to be informed on the latest information available regarding the events surrounding the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (or COVID-19).

    •   Wash your hands frequently with soap and water. Lather for at least 20 seconds every time. If no soap is available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol.
    •   Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands, particularly your eyes, nose, and mouth.
    •   Avoid close contact with people who are ill.
    •   Stay home when you are sick.
    •   Cover your mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
    •   Do not reuse tissues after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
    •   Clean and disinfect surfaces that are frequently touched, such as your mobile phone.

    Facemasks Are Only Recommended for Certain People

    The Centers for Disease Control does not recommend that healthy people wear a facemask for protection from coronavirus.

    If you have symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath), are a health worker, or are taking care of sick people at home or in a healthcare facility, a mask is recommended. A facemask should be used once, and then thrown away.

    For more information regarding Coronavirus (COVID-19), please go to: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/

    SOURCE: https://www.dukehealth.org/covid-19-update/preventing-coronavirus

  • Pinehurst office

    289 Olmsted Blvd Pinehurst, NC 28374

    910-295-6007

  • Hillsborough office

    209 Millstone Drive Hillsborough, NC 27278

    919-245-5400

  • Durham office

    4102 Ben Franklin Blvd Durham, NC 27704

    919-972-7700

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Dr. David Cowherd, MD, FACC - Pinehurst Medical Clinic

Carolina Behavioral Care has been my number one choice for my psychiatric referrals for the past 20 years. Their level of professionalism is unsurpassed and I have never been disappointed.

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