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Category Archives: Mental Health

  1. Kate Hudson shares how fitness fuels her mental health: ‘If I’m not active, if I’m not moving, I don’t feel good at all’

    The Unwind is Yahoo Life’s well-being series in which experts, influencers and celebrities share their approaches to wellness and mental health, from self-care rituals to setting healthy boundaries to the mantras that keep them afloat.

    There are many words to describe Kate Hudson — she’s an actress, a mom, a podcaster and a brand founder — but perhaps the most fitting word at the moment is simply busy. After all, Hudson — most recently seen in the juicy Apple TV+ series Truth Be Told — has a very big life. The daughter of Goldie Hawn and stepfather Kurt Russell balances spending time with her tight-knit family with her many projects, but when she does have a free moment, it’s rarely to sit still.

    As Hudson tells Yahoo Life, she craves movement, be that a dancing session in her bathroom or a gravity-defying workout routine.

    – ADVERTISEMENT –

    That’s why she needs a diet plan that works for her — which is what WW, the brand she’s been an ambassador for since 2018, can provide, thanks to its recently launched system of PersonalPoints. The program, which Hudson says helped her find balance, includes activity targets — ideal for someone like Hudson, who calls herself a “frustrated athlete.”

    Here, Hudson explains what wellness means to her, and why sometimes a girls’ night out is better self-care than anything else.

    You became a WW ambassador in 2018. What made you interested in partnering with the company?

    Mindy [Grossman], the CEO of WW, came to me. My mom had done it before when she was pregnant, but I hadn’t really done it before. Mindy said, “Try it, and get back to me.” So I did, and I was like, “How do people not know what this is?” First of all, I lost weight immediately, which is what everyone who is looking into this initially wants to do. But what I loved about it was how supportive the program was, and how thorough it is. For me, it just felt like, what a great partnership. People are always asking me, “What can I do?” And if you weren’t raised with the tools, it’s hard. You don’t know the best way for you to get strong, whether that’s mentally or physically. I just fell in love with the program and the science behind it and how well it works. I’ve been doing the partnership for years and I continue to use it. It just works.

    How did your family help you embrace a healthy lifestyle?

    When you grow up with actors for parents, it’s a very disciplined craft, especially if you’re an actor who really cares about what you’re doing, like my parents. I watched them be almost like athletes preparing for their roles. Whether it be how active they were, whatever the role entailed, they had to physically and mentally prepare for those things. When you see parents really care about their health and doing things right, it becomes what you know.

    I feel really lucky that I have a supportive family through the ups and downs of life. Not everyone has a family as close and connected as we are, and that’s a huge part of my overall wellness. I think mostly, my mom and my dad have always loved being active. That was the biggest thing for me. More so than food — we love our food, we love our cocktails and we enjoy all aspects of life. But we’re very active, and that’s what keeps our mental health really stable. That’s why I love WW, because they encourage the fit points. They want you to stay active. It’s about your sleep, your fitness — it’s motivating you to take care of those things.

    Your brother, Oliver Hudson, opened up about his own battle with anxiety for The Unwind. What was your reaction to him being so open about his struggles?

    I really admire him for his openness on the subject. I think people sit with anxiety and they don’t talk about it, and it’s so common. We’re living in a time that’s exasperating anxiety. We’re living in an anxious time that’s really affecting people, especially young people. I notice it with my son, and the young people around him. I admire that Oliver is like, “Hey, this is what’s happening, and this is what I’m doing about it.” It makes people feel like they can go get help. They can have a sense of humor about it.

    Oliver has really hardcore panic attacks, and I think the thing that you learn is that you need a holistic approach to anxiety. If you need medication, it’s going to a doctor and seeing a professional for guidance. There’s also activity, what you eat. It’s a huge part of how our brain functions, and how it can function, for better or worse. Food is what speaks to the rest of our system. If we’re not putting good things into our body, our body is going to shut down. All of these things matter. Turning off your phone, doing a digital cleanse. I think we should be doing that more. Getting off social media. Taking those breaks are really important. Remembering to look up and connect is a huge part of our mental health.

    What does self-care mean to you?

    For women, we need to tune in for ourselves. Self-care may be sitting at a wall for three minutes by ourselves. For women, especially — and I can only speak to women because I am a woman — we manage so much. We manage not only the practical side of things, but the emotional side of things, as well. It doesn’t mean there aren’t men who do the same things, but for women, it’s ingrained in us. We have to manage the emotional needs, often while also having careers and being the breadwinner. We have to be everything to everyone.

    Those moments, to me, when I want to take care of myself, I have to tune in. It’s different every time. I try to listen to myself, because I think every woman understands when they’ve had it and are at the end of their rope. When that moment happens, it’s usually because we’re not doing things for ourselves. That happened to me last night, and I went to dinner with my friends. I had a crying toddler who was like, “Mommy don’t go,” and it was terrible and hard, but I had to do that. And you know what? It filled my soul. You just have to tune in what you need in the moment.

    How does your fitness routine fit into your overall well-being?

    Fitness, for me, is my number one. I grew up dancing and moving. Kelly Ripa and I had a funny conversation one time, where we both called ourselves “frustrated athletes.” Growing up, whether it was dance or soccer or volleyball, I loved it. If I’m not active, if I’m not moving, I don’t feel good at all. I literally came home from my dinner last night, and I hadn’t really moved, so I just did some weird dance moves in the bathroom. I needed to get my energy flowing and things moving.

    To me, my mental health and stability can be very tied to how active I have been. It truly changes my brain. When I’m done working out, I just feel a thousand times better. It’s why I started [fitness clothing brand] Fabletics. It doesn’t mean you have to be some great athlete or gym shark. To me, it could be going for a walk. They’re showing all this amazing research about people who walk all the time. The areas where people live the longest, they just walk. They walk to everything.

    I see fitness as being active, not like being some sort of Olympian. As an expression, when we ride our bikes, when we hike, when we get into nature, when we dance, all of those things connect us to something outside of ourselves. It kind of lifts your spirit, on top of the science of fitness. It connects you to what’s outside of yourself. When you get too caught up in your own ego, it’s nice to see how small we are compared to all the other things in the world.

    This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

  2. Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

    The following is an article from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For more information regarding COVID-19, please visit their website.

    The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may be stressful for people and communities. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children.

    Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations.  The emotional impact of an emergency on a person can depend on the person’s characteristics and experiences, the social and economic circumstances of the person and their community, and the availability of local resources. People can become more distressed if they see repeated images or hear repeated reports about the outbreak in the media.

    People who may respond more strongly to the stress of a crisis include:

    • People who have preexisting mental health conditions including problems with substance use
    • Children
    • People who are helping with the response to COVID-19, like doctors and other health care providers, or first responders

    Additional information and resources on mental health care can be found at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) website.

    • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Hotline: 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
    • People with deafness or hearing loss can use their preferred relay service to call 1-800-985-5990.

    Reactions during an infectious disease outbreak can include:

    • Fear and worry about your own health status and that of your loved ones who may have been exposed to COVID-19
    • Changes in sleep or eating patterns
    • Difficulty sleeping or concentrating
    • Worsening of chronic health problems
    • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

    People with preexisting mental health conditions should continue with their treatment plans during an emergency and monitor for any new symptoms. Additional information can be found at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) website.

    Coping with these feelings and getting help when you need it will help you, your family, and your community recover from a disaster. Connect with family, friends, and others in your community. Take care of yourself and each other, and know when and how to seek help.

    Call your healthcare provider if stress reactions interfere with your daily activities for several days in a row.

    Things you can do to support yourself:

    • Avoid excessive exposure to media coverage of COVID-19.
    • Take care of your body. Take deep breaths, stretch or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, exercise regularly, get plenty of sleep and avoid alcohol and drugs.
    • Make time to unwind and remind yourself that strong feelings will fade. Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories. It can be upsetting to hear about the crisis and see images repeatedly. Try to do some other activities you enjoy to return to your normal life.
    • Connect with others. Share your concerns and how you are feeling with a friend or family member. Maintain healthy relationships.
    • Maintain a sense of hope and positive thinking.

    Share the facts about COVID-19 and the actual risk to others. People who have returned from areas of ongoing spread more than 14 days ago and do not have symptoms of COVID-19 do not put others at risk.

    What are quarantine and social distancing?

    • Quarantine separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick.
    • Social distancing means remaining out of places where people meet or gather, avoiding local public transportation (e.g., bus, subway, taxi, rideshare), and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others.

    Sharing accurate information can help calm fears in others and allow you to connect with them.

    Learn more about taking care of your emotional health.

    For parents:

    Children react, in part, on what they see from the adults around them. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to others around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

    Not all children respond to stress in the same way. Some common changes to watch for in children:

    • Excessive crying and irritation
    • Returning to behaviors they have outgrown (e.g., toileting accidents or bedwetting)
    • Excessive worry or sadness
    • Unhealthy eating or sleeping habits
    • Irritability and “acting out” behaviors
    • Poor school performance or avoiding school
    • Difficulty with attention and concentration
    • Avoidance of activities enjoyed in the past
    • Unexplained headaches or body pain
    • Use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

    There are many things you can do to support your child:

    • Take time to talk with your child about the COVID-19 outbreak. Answer questions and share facts about COVID-19 in a way that your child can understand.
    • Reassure your child that they are safe. Let them know if is ok if they feel upset. Share with them how you deal with your own stress so that they can learn how to cope from you.
    • Limit your child’s exposure to media coverage of the event. Children may misinterpret what they hear and can be frightened about something they do not understand.
    • Help your child to have a sense of structure. Once it is safe to return to school or child care, help them return to their regular activity.
    • Be a role model; take breaks, get plenty of sleep, exercise, and eat well. Connect with your friends and family members and rely on your social support system.

    Learn more about helping children cope.

    For responders:

    Responding to COVID-19 can take an emotional toll on you. There are things you can do to reduce secondary traumatic stress (STS) reactions:

    • Acknowledge that STS can impact anyone helping families after a traumatic event.
    • Learn the symptoms including physical (fatigue, illness) and mental (fear, withdrawal, guilt).
    • Allow time for you and your family to recover from responding to the outbreak.
    • Create a menu of personal self-care activities that you enjoy, such as spending time with friends and family, exercising, or reading a book.
    • Take a break from media coverage of COVID-19.
    • Ask for help if you feel overwhelmed or concerned that COVID-19 is affecting your ability to care for your family and patients as you did before the outbreak.

    For people who have been released from quarantine:

    Being separated from others if a health care provider thinks you may have been exposed to COVID-19 can be stressful, even if you do not get sick. Some typical reactions after being released from COVID-19 quarantine can include:

    • Mixed emotions, including relief after quarantine
    • Fear and worry about your own health status and that of your loved ones who may have been exposed to COVID-19
    • Stress from the experience of monitoring yourself, or being monitored by others for signs and symptoms of COVID-19
    • Sadness, anger, or frustration because friends or loved ones have unfounded fears of contracting the disease from contact with you, even though you have been determined not to be contagious
    • Guilt about not being able to perform normal work or parenting duties during quarantine
    • Other emotional or mental health changes

    Children may also feel upset or have other strong emotions if they, or someone they know, has been released from quarantine. You can help your child cope.

    Learn more tips for taking care of yourself during emergency response.

  3. Ketamine Treatment Center Open in Pinehurst

    ketamine, Pinehurst, N.C.Carolina Behavioral Care opened its first Ketamine Treatment Center at our Pinehurst, N.C., site in September 2017. Ketamine is a medicine which has been proven to be very effective (over 70 percent response rate) in treating severe, refractory, major depressive disorder. It has efficacy in the treatment of other psychiatric disorders, including anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, and post traumatic stress disorder. It is also used widely for the treatment of medical conditions including chronic pain, migraine headaches, fibromyalgia and reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Under the leadership of Dr. Robert Fleury and Dr. Robert Millet, we have developed an office-based, medically supervised program which is consistent with protocols developed by leading university medical centers in the United States.

    Ketamine treatment involves the administration of the drug by intravenous infusion. Before administering the medication, a thorough psychiatric and medical assessment is undertaken by the Carolina Behavioral Care staff.  The treatment requires four to six sessions, usually every other day for intravenous infusion of Ketamine followed by appropriate monitoring. Follow-up psychiatric monitoring is coordinated by the Carolina Behavioral Care staff. Maintenance therapy is also offered based on individual responses.

    Read more about this surprising effective drug therapy.

    To make a referral or schedule an appointment for Ketamine treatment, please call Carolina Behavioral Care at (844) 534-7208.

    Click here

  4. Screen Time Smarts: Developing Healthy Habits For Using Electronic Devices

    Screen time on electronic devices has become such a routine part of work, school, communication and recreation, it can be difficult to recognize when and how to turn off our screens. There is rising evidence pointing towards negative effects of excessive screen time on the mental and physical wellness of children and adults alike. It’s important to take a look at how we use our technology so we take advantage of its benefits and minimize harm to our health. Read more

  5. Substance Abuse Awareness: When Does Use Become Abuse?

    Substance abuse is common, so common in fact that almost every American will have to deal with it at some point in their lives. Whether it’s something they struggle with personally or as an issue for someone close to them, it makes sense for everyone to be aware about substance abuse. Unfortunately, most of the data gathered on substance abuse is on individuals who have already met diagnostic criteria for substance dependence and are headed for intensive treatment. This blog is about the warning signs for everyone that their (or someone else’s) use of alcohol, illicit, or prescription drugs is about to become a problem. Read more

  6. Sleep Hygiene: 12 Tips for Better Sleep

    Sleep Disorders Commonly Plague Many People

    Everyone, at some time in their lives, has experienced problems with sleep. Insomnia is the most common of the sleep disorders. And, as we have all experienced, insomnia is usually affected by things occurring over the normal course of our lives. For example, feeling stressed, worried, anxious or depressed as a result of life events can have a detrimental effect on the quality of our sleep. Normal healthy sleep is usually in the six to nine-hour range daily and any disturbance in that, such as difficulty falling asleep, mid- cycle awakening or early morning awakening, is generally considered the condition of insomnia. Read more

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Dr. David Cowherd, MD, FACC - Pinehurst Medical Clinic

Carolina Behavioral Care has been my number one choice for my psychiatric referrals for the past 20 years. Their level of professionalism is unsurpassed and I have never been disappointed.

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